Countries A-F

Argentina

Argentina has two nuclear reactors generating nearly one-tenth of its electricity, and another reactor finishing construction. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1974.

Armenia

Armenia has relied heavily on nuclear power since 1976. It has one reactor in operation and the government has approved a joint venture to build another by 2020.

Australia

Australia's uranium has been mined since 1954, and four mines are currently operating. Australia's known uranium resources are the world's largest - 31% of the world total. It is the world's third-ranking producer, behind Kazakhstan and Canada.

Bangladesh

Bangladesh plans to have two large Russian nuclear power reactors in operation in the 2020s. This is to meet rapidly-increasing demand and reduce dependence on natural gas.

Belarus

Belarus plans to have its first nuclear power plant operating from 2018, with Russian finance. Atomstroyexport has contracted to build the 2400 MWe plant.

Belgium

Belgium has seven nuclear reactors generating about half of its electricity. Belgium's first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1974. There has been little government support for nuclear energy.

Brazil

Brazil has two nuclear reactors generating 3% of its electricity, and a third under construction. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1982.

Bulgaria

Bulgaria has two nuclear reactors generating about 35% of its electricity. Bulgaria's first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1974. Government commitment to the future of nuclear energy is strong, though finance is lacking.

Canada: Nuclear Power

About 15% of Canada's electricity comes from nuclear power. For many years Canada has been a leader in nuclear research and technology, as well as a high proportion of the world supply of radioisotopes used in medical diagnosis and cancer therapy.

Canada: Uranium

Canada was the world's largest uranium producer for many years, accounting for about 22% of world output. Canada will have a significant role in meeting future world demand for uranium.

China: Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Although China intends to become self-sufficient in most aspects of the fuel cycle, it relies increasingly on imported uranium as well as conversion, enrichment and fabrication services from other countries.

China: Nuclear Power

China has become largely self-sufficient in reactor design and construction, as well as other aspects of the fuel cycle. China nuclear capacity is planned to reach at least 58 GWe by 2020-21, then up to 150 GWe by 2030.

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic has six nuclear reactors generating about one-third of its electricity. Its first commercial nuclear power reactor began operating in 1985. Government commitment to the future of nuclear energy is strong.

Denmark

Denmark gets most of its electricity from coal, and a substantial amount from wind.The country is part of two major electrical grids which depend on nuclear power for much of the base-load supply.

 

Finland

Finland has four nuclear reactors providing nearly 30% of its electricity. A fifth reactor is now under construction and two more are planned. Provisions for radioactive waste disposal are well advanced.

France

France derives over 75% of its electricity from nuclear energy. This is due to a long-standing policy based on energy security. France is the world's largest net exporter of electricity due to its very low cost of nuclear generation.