World Nuclear Association at COP 22

Nuclear for Climate was hosted at the World Nuclear Association stand at COP 22. 

Agneta Rising, Director General of the World Nuclear Association, took part in a press conference  on the theme of “Forming energy of future: role of nuclear industry in global  reduction of CO2 emissions” on Thursaday 17 November in Press Conference Room Rabat at 15:00. 

A Rostaom press release is available here: ROSATOM Took Part In UNFCCC COP22 Conference On Climate Change

World Nuclear Association also issued a press release, available here: 

17 November 2016: Press Release

Nuclear must be part of the international response to climate change

Agneta Rising, Director General of the World Nuclear Association has called on parties to make it clear that nuclear energy will be part of their response to succeed in action on climate change.

Speaking at a press conference hosted by the Russian delegation today at the UNFCCC COP 22 climate change conference in Marrakech, Agneta Rising said; “Electricity is a vital part of our modern world. Full global access to reliable and affordable electricity supplies is essential. To meet the climate change objectives of the Paris agreement this must be achieved using all low carbon sources of electricity. Nuclear is a proven source of low carbon electricity. It promotes the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions while fostering sustainable development.”

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Speaking at the same event, Kirill Komarov, First Deputy CEO for Corporate Development and International Business of Rosatom, noted that to meet world demand for electricity and tackle climate change there was a need to review the entire world energy supply with the aim to reduce carbon emissions. “We believe that in these circumstances, the most effective solution is to expand the use of nuclear power generation “, he said.

Kirill Komarov continued, “We are confident that the future of energy is a diversified balance of low-carbon technologies, providing affordability, security of supply and minimal environmental impact.”

Governments should act and give the policy support that is needed to be able to provide nuclear energy, which is low carbon, competitive, reliable and scalable energy. Nuclear is proven to scale up fast and the  nuclear sector is ready to deliver 

The members of the world’s nuclear industry have agreed a goal of constructing 1000 GW of new nuclear build by 2050, tripling the global capacity, so that nuclear would generate 25% of global electricity demand.

Over the last 45 years, nuclear generation has avoided the equivalent of two years of the world’s total carbon dioxide emissions – nearly 80 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide.

Agneta Rising said, “France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Canada’s province of Ontario, have all achieved more than 80% low carbon electricity generation by using nuclear energy in harmony with renewable.  By using nuclear energy those countries have already achieved the kind of low carbon generation mixes that the whole world will have to adopt by 2050 if we are to meet the targets set by the Paris Agreement.

18 November 2016: WNN Article

Nuclear vital to challenge of climate change

Agneta Rising, director-general of the World Nuclear Association, has called on Conference of the Parties (COP) to make it clear that nuclear energy will be part of their response to succeed in action on climate change. "France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Canada's province of Ontario, have all achieved more than 80% low-carbon electricity generation by using nuclear energy in harmony with renewables," Rising said yesterday at a press conference hosted by the Russian delegation to the UNFCCC COP 22 climate change conference in Marrakesh.

 

4 November 2016: WNN Article

Nuclear community gets ready for Paris Agreement

Countries planning to use nuclear power to meet their climate change goals will pool experience as part of a forthcoming research effort by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (more)

 

4 November: Press Release 

Nuclear energy needed to enable Paris Agreement objectives to be met

4 November 2016

Entry into force of the Paris Agreement on 4 November commits governments to keep the increase in average global temperature to well below 2 °C and to pursue efforts to limit this to 1.5 °C. This will require ambitious action across all sectors. A priority should be the decarbonisation of the electricity supply sector, using nuclear energy in harmony with other forms of low carbon generation.

The next steps to achieving these goals will be taken at the COP 22 climate change conference Marrakech that starts on 7 November.

Agneta Rising, Director General , World Nuclear Association said  “COP 22 needs to enable governments to take practical and meaningful progress towards meeting the objectives of the Paris Agreement. This should include supporting the contribution nuclear can make to achieving a low carbon global electricity generation mix.”

Today, the world’s 450 nuclear power plants generate enough electricity to avoid the emissions of two and a half billion tonnes of carbon dioxide each year, compared to the coal-fired baseload generation that nuclear typically displaces. New nuclear plants that have started operation since COP 21 will save more than 70 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year.

Countries and regions that have decarbonised have done so by including nuclear energy in harmony with other low carbon forms of electricity generation. France, Sweden, Switzerland and Ontario have made major cuts in the use of fossil fuels by using nuclear energy alongside other low carbon options, such as renewables.

The world’s nuclear industry has endorsed a goal of supplying 25% of the world’s electricity with nuclear generation by 2050, a target that will require the construction of 1000 GWe of new nuclear capacity. Currently, nuclear energy supplies around 11% of the world’s electricity needs.

 


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